Learn About Al-Anon support-groups

Al-Anon History

Al-Anon is a network of family support groups, which helps persons whose families are affected by alcoholism. This kind of a support group is after assisting people overcome their addiction to alcohol.


Al-Anon was founded in 1951 as an organization for providing support to friends and relatives of drunkards. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the first alcoholic support group that was started by the husband of Lois Wilson who went on to later start her own support group, Al-Anon. Dealing with the difficulties of providing support to a recovering alcoholic during her life, she decided to create an organization for people similar to her. Al-Anon thrives through the contributions of its members. The family of the addicts usually get tips on how they can help their loved ones and live comfortably with them.


The fight against alcoholism is a joint undertaking and that is the objective of this support group.


Alcoholism Is A Family Illness

Since it has a deleterious influence on both the drinker and those around them, Al-anon treats the disease of alcoholism as a family illness. A clear-cut system of friends and family members support is an integral part of recovery from alcoholism.

Lack of understanding the cause of their loved one's drinking problem makes family members suffer self-condemnation and also not know how to deal with the problem. The Al-Anon group meetings help bring these issues to light and teach members how to deal with alcoholism as it affects the whole family.


Alateen Is Al-Anon For Teenagers

Al-Anon is also home for a group which is identified as Alateen and is catering to youngsters that are affected by alcoholism within their family.

Such meetings allow youngsters to meet with others of the same age, making their experience more relatable and efficient.


Why Join An Al-Anon Group

Members of Al-Anon benefit from being introduced to a number of people and families who could have suffered from the problem of alcoholism. The best part about this program is that you can all relate with the same issue. With this program, you get to share experiences with people who have faced situations similar to yours. There are Al-Anon meetings all across the nation. Call us on 0800 772 3971 to help you find one near you.


What You Can Expect From A Meeting

If you know someone who is an alcoholic, then Al-Anon is the best place for you. You just need to identify whether the alcoholism of a particular individual is concerning you and make it known it is affecting your lifestyle, and rest assured that Al-Anon can provide the assistance you need.

The outcomes of these meetings is what scares some people from coming. When thinking of attending a meeting, some things should be kept in mind

  • First and foremost, attending Al-Anon is anonymous
  • All the members of this group have had an encounter with an alcoholic in their lives
  • While members are encouraged to speak up and discuss their problem, they are under no obligation to do so
  • Meetings Offered Can Vary
  • You may find some more beneficial to you than others.
  • Al-Anon is not an organization which is based on any religion
  • These meetings are focused on the 12 Step program by Al-Anon

Al-Anon meetings are carried out under a slogan that encourages all attendees to "take only what they like, leaving the rest." Based on this formula the meetings concentrate on the sharing of experiences and the hardships of the attendees rather than giving them any instructions about what they should do.


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The 12 Stages Of Al-Anon

The recovery stages are outlined before the meeting starts. The 12 steps were adapted from the AA 12 Step program. Members of Al-Anon can take help from a sponsor who can assist them to work through the steps and is available for any support needed during hardships of any kind just as the case is with Alcoholics Anonymous. These stages are

  • We admitted we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • This is the point where alcoholism recognised as a conditioner that has affected them all.
  • Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  • Members frequently motivate themselves to the brink by trying to reform or control their loved one.
  • After they admit they are powerless, they learn how to accept that they can be helped to regain their sanity.
  • Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood him.
  • It is important that members learn to let go.
  • Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  • A huge part of the steps are self-discovery, and this is the beginning of the procedure.
  • Attendees have the option of creating a list of how they could have wronged themselves or their loved ones with examples like threats issued, Etc.
  • Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to others human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  • Writing each problem enables them to examine them one by one.
  • We are entirely prepared to have god remove all these defects of character.
  • This is an important step because it comes after accepting in full that the recovery process is supported by a greater power.
  • calmly begged Him to remove our drawbacks.
  • When they reach This point, the member can realize the part they played by judging and trying to control their loved ones which could have driven them into more drinking.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  • Most often making amends begins with yourself.
  • Many people blame themselves for their loved ones addiction.
  • They must be willing and prepared to forgive themselves and to make amends.
  • Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  • When you decide to make amends, Then follows the action of doing so.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Passing through these twelve Steps is a time-consuming process.
  • There is also a possibility for relapse when trying to recover in the program.
  • Step 10 makes this clear that the process takes long.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  • This step is a personal, spiritual one; it comprises acceptance and comfort in view of the great stress of recovery.
  • Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.
  • This stage appreciates the fact that the process is long and doesnt end after a while.
  • Members are then motivated to assist other members with what they have learned.

A Greater Understanding Of The Higher Power

Despite Al-Anon not being a religious program of any kind, the members within do have an acceptance of a greater power. The term "higher power" is, however, open to interpretation according to the personal beliefs of individuals. All religions are well represented and no one is forced to change to another religion.